Trigeminal Disturbance Hypothesis of Parkinson’s

Dr. Jennings

It is undeniable that something has been missed in the “dopamine hypothesis” as to the cause of Parkinson’s disease, particularly after seeing many Parkinson’s cases dramatically improve with bite therapy.  After an extensive review of the literature, Dr. Jennings has proposed an alternative theory:

The Trigeminal Disturbance  Hypothesis: Long term disturbances in the trigeminal system are the underlying cause of most forms of Parkinson’s.  In most cases the trigeminal nerve disturbance will be due to jaw malalignment, though it could be from other disturbances within the trigeminal system. Under this hypothesis, tremors, the primary symptom of Parkinson’s, is believed to be caused by trigeminal mesencephalic input altering the reticular formation. This is why many cases of tremors immediately cease with bite changes.

There is massive evidence within the medical literature that this is the case.  Not the least of which is the response that many dentist around the world are reporting in the treatment of Parkinson’s with jaw orthopedic repositioning appliances.   I shall be presenting the vast evidence over the next few months in this website.

November 18, 2011

Dwight Jennings, DDS

6 Responses to Trigeminal Disturbance Hypothesis of Parkinson’s

  1. Bonnie says:

    I am a couple weeks shy of 62 and I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease five or six months ago in Oct 2011. My first symptoms showed up around the age of 60. So far my symptoms are minimal, mostly a slight tremor in my left hand. I’m very curious about the connection to TMJ. I ground my teeth terribly as a child and my jaw used to pop and crack in every direction I moved it. Now I have such a problem with my bite that my dentist is having trouble even being able to create a removable plate to give me some upper molars which I have recently lost and don’t have enough bone to replace with implants. I am very interested in any information regarding the connection between TMJ and Parkinsons.

    • dwight says:

      Bonnie:
      I would suggest that you look at all that this site has to offer, and also connect with Parkinsonsresource.org. The primary problem that is typically found with Parkinsons is a major vertical deficiency in the bite. It is harder to get the body properly aligned with missing molars- you might want to investigate “short implants” for just stabilization under a denture, not for the purpose of putting crowns on them.
      Dr. Jennings

      • Liliana says:

        I am a couple weeks shy of 62 and I was dginaosed with Parkinson’s Disease five or six months ago in Oct 2011. My first symptoms showed up around the age of 60. So far my symptoms are minimal, mostly a slight tremor in my left hand. I’m very curious about the connection to TMJ. I ground my teeth terribly as a child and my jaw used to pop and crack in every direction I moved it. Now I have such a problem with my bite that my dentist is having trouble even being able to create a removable plate to give me some upper molars which I have recently lost and don’t have enough bone to replace with implants. I am very interested in any information regarding the connection between TMJ and Parkinsons.

        • dwight says:

          The problem that shows up in most, but not all, Parkinsons patients is that they have too much vertical space between their teeth when their jaw relaxes (what dentists call freeway space). This affects trigeminal nerve sensory input into the brain stem, thus causing tremors.

          Most likely your jaw has been off all your life, thus causing the grinding, with increased likelihood of dental decay and bone loss(jaw misalignment causes elevated “substance P” which controls bone metabolism. You most lilely need your jaw repositioned (aligned) through proper am and pm appliances. This is a tricky process (called jaw orthopedic repositioning) that is poorly understood by most dentists. This should get rid of the jaw joint noise and the tremor.

  2. Barbara says:

    I suffered with TMJ long before they found out that my jaw had never developed completely. I have had five left jaw surgeries. They even replaced the jawbone with my rib bone. The last surgery has been the most successful, that of making a jawbone using the computer. However, I began having a tremor in my left hand about two years ago. I have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease, essential tremors, Parkinsons-like tremors, etc.

    I now have problems up and down my left side. My foot, leg, and arm all swell and are very painful. One spot in my shoulder is extremely sore. I have Bell’s palsy and have a lot of difficulty chewing and talking. I often bite the underside of my tongue and my bottom lip. My doctor told me today that he was referring me to a neurologist.

    Any comments would be appreciated.

    • dwight says:

      Barbara: Your many symptoms strongly suggest that your jaw is not supported in proper orthopedic alignment (left body pain, Bell’s Palsy, tremor, limb swelling). It is still possible to get the jaw aligned even if the jaw is reconstructed. You would want to check your bite with a number of functional tests and possibly TENS. Dr. J

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