Parkinson’s treatment with stem cells

Below is an article that I think is important, but which I believe will fail as my research shows that Parkinsons is due to a long term disturbance in the trigeminal system (most cases due to jaw malalignment).  If the initial problem is never fixed, there is no expectation that the problem will go away.  The fix would be temporary at best.

Dr. Jennings

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4134343.stm

Monkey stem cells can repair the brain damage caused by Parkinson’s disease, Japanese researchers have shown.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, offer renewed hope of a similar treatment for humans.  Until now, research showing stem cell therapy can work in Parkinson’s has mainly been carried out on rodents.  The Kyoto University team said more research was now needed to prove the treatment was safe and effective.

Repair

Stem cells are premature cells that are capable of becoming any of a number of mature cells within the body, given the right conditions.

Dr Jun Takahashi and colleagues took some stem cells from monkeys and encouraged them to grow into the brain cells, or neurons, that are damaged in Parkinson’s disease.  These are neurons that produce the chemical messenger dopamine.

To encourage their development the researchers exposed the stem cells to a growth factor that is produced exclusively in the area of the brain affected by Parkinson’s disease and is thought to have a protective effect on dopamine-producing neurons.

These results suggest that transplantation using embryonic stem cells as a clinical therapy for Parkinson’s disease is approaching the point of technical feasibility. The study authors

They then transplanted the stem cell-derived dopamine-producing neurons into monkeys with a condition analogous to human Parkinson’s disease.

The transplanted cells worked as hoped, and reduced the symptoms of Parkinson’s in the monkeys.  The researchers said: “These results suggest that transplantation using embryonic stem cells as a clinical therapy for Parkinson’s disease is approaching the point of technical feasibility.”

But they said a number of safety and efficacy concerns still needed addressing. Rodents treated in a similar way went on to develop tumors.  Also, the number of cells produced by the stem cell technique may still be too few to treat humans.

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